Back to the Suite Journal

Here are 3 reasons the perfect candidate rejected your offer

You’ve spoken to hundreds of candidates, conducted dozens of interviews, and finally, you have made it to the end and have reached the offer stage with the candidate of your dreams. Then, in complete surprise to you, they reject the offer. Anyone who has spent time in recruiting will have a story just like this one. Why does this happen? Well, first things first, things like this are inevitable when you’re dealing with people; however, most often it is actually the search process itself that led you to this point. So let’s take a look at three common mistakes that may have caused your search process to end in disaster.


1: You moved too slow.

Hiring is all about momentum. From the first conversation to the offer delivery, you must maintain a swift cadence that builds on the candidate’s excitement with each stage. It’s a careful balancing act that requires you to move fast enough to beat out others, but slow enough to allow them to fully explore the opportunity and feel comfortable deciding. For a small business, speed can be one of your greatest assets when hiring. For larger companies, be sure to align stakeholders beforehand and have a process in place to create a smooth and consistent flow of interview steps. Great talent does not remain on the market for long and although the current market favors companies, top talent will always be snatched up quickly.


2: You bet it all on one horse.

Often, you’ll identify a favorite after only a single conversation. It’s fine if that happens; however, make sure you do not develop tunnel vision and lose sight of others who would make strong hires. Many companies weed out candidates too quickly and end up with only one option halfway through the search. You’ll want to have at least two candidates at the final stages of the process. If you can manage to have three, that’s even better. Now, remember, don’t offer all three of them as that will reflect poorly on your organization, but be sure to give yourself options when it comes to that stage in the process.

And last, but not least…


3: You sold the role to someone who didn’t want it.

Recruiting is a sales job and anyone who has spent time doing it will attest to that. After all, you are persuading someone who may not even know your company to leave their current job that they’ve grown accustomed to. In truth, it’s unlikely that a tougher sell exists; however, you must be careful with how hard you sell an opportunity to someone as overselling the opportunity will likely lead to the search coming undone just before the finish line. Yes, you need to make sure to tell a compelling story, but convincing someone to consider the job who was never going to accept it in the first place is a sure way to derail a search process.

Make sure the person you offer actually wants the job you’re offering them and don’t be afraid to ask them that directly. Many talent professionals tend to dance around the issue and refrain from asking awkward questions, but in reality, the awkward question will prevent unwanted time waste.


In conclusion.

It is crucial that you avoid these mistakes during your next search as failure to do so may severely hinder your company’s ability to bring in talent. After all, even without these mistakes, over 50% of searches fail to close on the first attempt. The risk of failure is simply too high to make these mistakes and when you consider the added cost of hiring an external search firm, a faulty hiring process could have an even greater negative impact on your business and PnL. In conclusion, if you can avoid making these mistakes, you will see your organiation’s talent acquisition capabilities drastically improve. If you find yourself wanting additional hiring guidance or support, sign up to The Suite (link to enterprise team) and allow us to be your channel to top talent.


Back to the Suite Journal